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Critical Care

This category contains 18 posts

Surviving Sepsis Guidelines 2013

The most recent iteration of Surviving Sepsis has been published in Critical Care Medicine and Intensive Care Medicine. The can be downloaded here (please click). Below is a summary of the Guidelines: A. Initial Resuscitation 1. Protocolized, quantitative resuscitation of patients with sepsis-induced tissue hypoperfusion (defined in this document as hypotension persisting after initial fluid … Continue reading

High Frequency Oscillation – Shaken by Bad News!

Summary: Two Papers Published Online in the NEJM, OSCILLATE and OSCAR, have failed to demonstrate that HFOV benefits patients with ARDS. In the OSCILLATE study there was an 11% increase in 28 day mortality (NNH 9). HFOV should not be used in routine management of patients with ARDS. For the past two decades many intensivists … Continue reading

Tuesday morning meetings January 2013

22nd Advanced Airway Management Dr Brian Harte 29th Airway challenges in Maxillofacial surgery Dr Jane Bruton

Transfusion Strategy – Think Restrictive

A half generation ago, the TRICC trial (here) suggested that routine blood transfusion in critically ill patients did not confer benefit if the haemoglobin level was above 7g/dl. This resulted in a evidence based paradigm for lower transfusion triggers. The problem was – how do you deal with the bleeding patients? A recent study in … Continue reading

Is it time to re-evaluate core concepts of Neuro-Intensive Care?

Over the past 2 or 3 decades a variety of technologies have been introduced into the clinical care of the brain injured patient – intraventricular ICP monitoring devices,SjVO2, brain tissue oxygen devices, microdialysis, xenon flow scanning, etc. However, compared with general critical care, the evidence base for protocols based on the utilization of these technologies … Continue reading

EUSOS follow up – is it the beds?

Over the next few months I am sure that the real reasons for the comparatively poor outcomes of Irish patients in the EUSOS study will emerge. In the meantime, we can only guess the reasons. Aside from blaming surgeons for poor patient selection (which is suspiciously convenient), case volume may be a problem, the time … Continue reading

24 hour Intensivist Presence – desirable? Maybe. Efficient, Economic and Effective – Unlikely

Few issues have been more controversial in the past 20 years than the implementation of the intensivist model. Fundamentally this involves delegation of primary responsibility for critically ill patients to a narrow group of clinicians, whose primary training may be in an entirely different specialty. Hence, surgical patients may be managed by internists, and medical … Continue reading

At last – Chloride is nephrotoxic

For years I have been trotting around the world telling everyone that NaCl 0.9% is evil, because each litre delivers 50mmol of HCL and chloride is nephrotoxic. This belief has come from a series of studies in volunteers (reduced GFR, reduced splanchnic perfusion, reduced cortical blood flow) and observations (increased contrast nephropathy with NaCl versus … Continue reading

No I won’t do it and here is the proof!

As a junior doctor how many times were you called to replace an iv catheter on a veinless patient because with was 3 days old (and “hospital policy” and all that). There was no point asking to see the evidence on which this “policy” was based. Whatever! – here is the counter evidence, and it … Continue reading

Just when you thought it was unsafe….HES again!

A couple of weeks ago I announced the imminent death of colloid. Now it’s back with another “Safe” trial (known as CHEST) from our colleagues in Australia and New Zealand (here). The study enrolled a colossal number of patients (7000) to either isotonic saline (IS) or Voluven (R). This is a 130/0.4 tetrastarch in isotonic … Continue reading