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Anaesthesia, Critical Care, Fluids, General Medicine, Outcomes, Patient Safety, Postoperative Care

No I won’t do it and here is the proof!

As a junior doctor how many times were you called to replace an iv catheter on a veinless patient because with was 3 days old (and “hospital policy” and all that). There was no point asking to see the evidence on which this “policy” was based. Whatever! – here is the counter evidence, and it is in the Lancet (here).

The study in question was a multicentre, randomised, non-blinded equivalence trial recruited adults (≥18 years) with an intravenous catheter of expected use longer than 4 days from three hospitals in Queensland, Australia in 2008-09 (why so long to publish?). There were 3283 patients randomised (5907 catheters- 1593 clinically indicated; 1690 routine replacement).

The mean time the iv cannulae lasted when they were in situ on day 3 was 99 h (SD 54) when replaced as clinically indicated and 70 h (13) when routinely replaced. In other words – not routinely changing the catheter resulted in it being in place for 1.25 extra days. Phlebitis occurred in 114 of 1593 (7%) patients in the clinically indicated group and in 114 of 1690 (7%) patients in the routine replacement group: ABSOLUTELY NO DIFFERENCE, NONE, STOP ASKING ME LEAVE ME ALONE!

So, if the iv site looks ok – it is ok. Don’t go prodding the patient.

About Pat Neligan

Pat Neligan lives and works in Galway, Ireland

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